Resting

I woke up around 4:30am this morning to Judah throwing a tantrum. Since age three, he’s been pretty good about sleeping through the night (thank you melatonin) but on occasion he gets stuck in a sleep routine that’s less than desirable. The past few mornings, he’s been up around 4:30am and while that sounds brutally early, this morning, was just a little comical.

It’s pitch black and I make my way into the room. I can hear him screaming and I know it’s the mad kind of tantrum, not the I’m-hurt-come-save-me kind. I can’t see anything, but I hear Jacob’s sleepy voice say, “Judy…” and I’m still searching, but can’t find him. I sort of trip over a toy and find myself on my hands and knees and oddly enough I hear Judah louder down there. I abandon the bed and blanket search and finally realize that Judah is under his bed. He’s under his bed, screaming and flailing and I finally manage to score an ankle. I tug him out and go through the ritual of deep pressure hugs, calming voice and then finally, “Judah. It’s time to stop screaming. One. Two…” and just before I get to three I hear a man’s voice say, “Judah, calm down honey.” I yell at the man, “Get out!” genuinely unsure of who the man is. I finish calming Judah down and it’s not until we’re all quietly back in bed that I realize the man was Josh. After four years of middle of the night wakings, Josh says he’s used to my incoherent ways and loves me anyway.



 

While Judah was in preschool this morning, Jacob and I caught up on some coffee, chocolate milk and vanilla scones while surveying the beach.

We’ve had a few rainy days lately and I love how the webs hold on to the droplets.


Little cutie! He totally shut us in the sunporch as pay-back for not letting him eat Jacob’s finger paints. It’s a price I’m willing to pay. 

:)  

Two things: What is it about counting to three that makes kids calm down or obey? And more importantly, why was Judah under his bed at 4:30 in the morning? I have no clue! All is well though and we’re having a very restful, homey kind of afternoon; which is much needed for this mama. Lack of sleep is getting to me and I think an early bed time is in order.

Thank you again to Caroline from

 Chocolate and Carrots for guest posting yesterday! Didn’t you guys enjoy that recipe? It’s definitely next on my list of goodies to make.:)

Veterinary medicine

Veterinary medicine is the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, disorder and injury in non-human animals. The scope of veterinary medicine is wide, covering all animal species, both domesticated and wild, with a wide range of conditions which can affect different species.

Veterinary medicine is widely practiced, both with and without professional supervision. Professional care is most often led by a veterinary physician (also known as a vet, veterinary surgeon or veterinarian), but also by paraveterinary workers such as veterinary nurses or technicians. This can be augmented by other paraprofessionals with specific specialisms such as animal physiotherapy or dentistry, and species relevant roles such as farriers.

Veterinary science

Veterinary science helps human health through the monitoring and control of zoonotic disease (infectious disease transmitted from non-human animals to humans), food safety, and indirectly through human applications from basic medical research. They also help to maintain food supply through livestock health monitoring and treatment, and mental health by keeping pets healthy and long living. Veterinary scientists often collaborate with epidemiologists, and other health or natural scientists depending on type of work. Ethically, veterinarians are usually obliged to look after animal welfare.

Deepwood Veterinary Clinic

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