Weekly Gratitude

Yesterday I found a piece of dried up chicken salad in my hair. Whatever, it’s a hazard of the job. Plus it reminded me that Judah added two new foods to his diet this week. (!!!) Chicken salad and nectarines never tasted so good. After a lifetime (4 years) of routine eating, he’s branching out. For that, I’ll take dried chicken salad in my hair any day.

Jacob has learned to sing. He’s learned the words to almost every nursery rhyme that we sing around here and joins in at bed time. My favorite though is his attempt at creating his own songs. It’s basically the same sentence over and over, but it’s mostly on tune and ends with, “You like dat song, mama?” Yes, baby, I love it. I write a lot about Judah’s accomplishments, but that’s not because Jacob is a bump on a rock. I am so thankful that he stops me in my tracks with cute little songs and forces my focus back on the simple, wonderful things in life…like making up your own song and belting it out.

Since moving here, I’ve felt a little distance from Target; and not just because of the milage between my tucked away home and it’s bustling location. We (Target and I) used to have such great, peaceful shopping experiences. Our Target here is always busy, but this morning, bright and early and in need of coffee, the Mister and I walked around with the Little Gingers. Thank you Starbucks for being inside Target and thank you Target for being quiet this morning and having that great water table on clearance. (p.s. I still love you)

And quickly now, because I have to wash this day old make up off my face and scrub the strip of syrup out of my hair before the boys wake up from their nap…

 

Thank you clouds for giving us a cool and breezy week. Thank you sun for shining randomly this weekend and helping us emerge from the short stint in crazy town (we like a lazy, stay at home week, but by Friday are starting to go crazy). Thank you grocery store for delivering groceries yesterday and not forgetting our strawberries and pound cake (even though you were “out of” hot dogs and toilet paper…?! But then again, that did lead to a trip to Target, so I guess thanks for that too). And last but not least, thank you sweet and kind, elderly couple at the post office. You literally made my week by smiling and making funny faces at my boys and then chatting with me like we’ve known each other for years. I hope I run into you again and we become fast friends.

How was your week? I hope good!

Veterinary medicine

Veterinary medicine is the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, disorder and injury in non-human animals. The scope of veterinary medicine is wide, covering all animal species, both domesticated and wild, with a wide range of conditions which can affect different species.

Veterinary medicine is widely practiced, both with and without professional supervision. Professional care is most often led by a veterinary physician (also known as a vet, veterinary surgeon or veterinarian), but also by paraveterinary workers such as veterinary nurses or technicians. This can be augmented by other paraprofessionals with specific specialisms such as animal physiotherapy or dentistry, and species relevant roles such as farriers.

Veterinary science

Veterinary science helps human health through the monitoring and control of zoonotic disease (infectious disease transmitted from non-human animals to humans), food safety, and indirectly through human applications from basic medical research. They also help to maintain food supply through livestock health monitoring and treatment, and mental health by keeping pets healthy and long living. Veterinary scientists often collaborate with epidemiologists, and other health or natural scientists depending on type of work. Ethically, veterinarians are usually obliged to look after animal welfare.

Deepwood Veterinary Clinic

22 April 2019

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