Instagram: I heart you

I bought chocolate covered Bing Cherries at the start of this weekend and stashed them by the computer as incentive to finish this post. It’s working…although taking breaks between each sentence to stuff another one in my mouth is getting to be a bit much. If I suddenly stop writing and leave you with only photos to look at, you should know my cherries have run out.

Photo Credit: I left both my camera and my phone in the car, so Josh busted out his Instagram last night.

There are weekends when we leisurely join society and consume coffee with the masses before shopping or sight seeing. Then there are busy weekends like this past one. We have a to-do list and social plans take a back seat. We did squeeze in a short evening picnic (not our best meal, but an indulgent one for sure).This is why I won’t spend more than a few dollars on sunglasses. He’s a cutie with sticky fingers and I don’t mind sharing my shades with him. Especially after he’s picked me a whole bunch of lovely flowers. It’s toddler version of wine and dine…and it works because he’s got my heart.
The park where we picnicked is now my favorite. It’s a quiet, out of the way park with a path by the water and lots of wildlife around. I love the hustle and bustle of town, but there are days when quiet-calm is craved. 
Little known fact, if you are wearing glasses, you will be Judah’s best friend. And if you don’t let him try them on, he’ll giggle and flash his charmer smile until you do.

 

Our picnic evening was the highlight of our weekend, but if I’m being honest, I ruined the beginning of the day with my bad attitude. Judah smeared cheese grits all over the floor and then dumped half of Jacob’s cereal onto the carpet. I’d been up off and on with him since 2am and the morning coffee was bitter. The world series of bad moments, topped by rookie of the year bad attitude. (Yeah, I’m a baseball fan) Then I read this proverb: “He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, And he who rules his spirit than he who takes a city.” – Proverbs 16:32

Sometimes I just need that extra reminder and it snaps me back.

How was your weekend? Did you have any special plans for the holiday or are you consuming all the candy tonight? :) We have a stash of chocolate to hand out and I’m hoping our neighborhood kids come by or else I’ll be eating it all.

{photos from last week’s visit with Grandma and Papa}The only way to play hide and seek: freak out at the last minute, lay down and shut your eyes. If you can’t see them, they can’t see you. :)

Veterinary medicine

Veterinary medicine is the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, disorder and injury in non-human animals. The scope of veterinary medicine is wide, covering all animal species, both domesticated and wild, with a wide range of conditions which can affect different species.

Veterinary medicine is widely practiced, both with and without professional supervision. Professional care is most often led by a veterinary physician (also known as a vet, veterinary surgeon or veterinarian), but also by paraveterinary workers such as veterinary nurses or technicians. This can be augmented by other paraprofessionals with specific specialisms such as animal physiotherapy or dentistry, and species relevant roles such as farriers.

Veterinary science

Veterinary science helps human health through the monitoring and control of zoonotic disease (infectious disease transmitted from non-human animals to humans), food safety, and indirectly through human applications from basic medical research. They also help to maintain food supply through livestock health monitoring and treatment, and mental health by keeping pets healthy and long living. Veterinary scientists often collaborate with epidemiologists, and other health or natural scientists depending on type of work. Ethically, veterinarians are usually obliged to look after animal welfare.

Deepwood Veterinary Clinic

22 April 2019

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