how to search online

About twenty million times today (slight exaggeration) I freaked out thinking there was a bug crawling down my back. Like not my upper back, but the lower back leading to my pant’s waist band. It took about half the day to finally realize I was not being attacked by a phantom spider (there was no other explanation, it was a spider and I had every right to freak out). I know, it took me half a day to figure that out? Having long hair that sheds like a Siberian Husky in Spring has it’s downfalls. I googled “I’m wondering which animal sheds its hair the most” and that’s what came up on eHow.com, so if that’s not true, which I seriously doubt because it’s on the internets, then please forgive me. Obviously it was just a lone hair shedding down my shirt and I stopped freaking out over spiders and went about my day. The point is, when searching for something online, always type in the exact sentence you’re thinking. Key words such as “burger joint” and “thrift store” will only confuse the search engine. Try “Where can I find a burger on a whole wheat bun with tomatoes and onions near ____” or “I need a used dining room table and chairs, which thrift store near ___ is the best?”. Just a little lesson on how to search the interwebs. (I’m totally making fun of myself because that is exactly how I search for things).

 

Siberian Huskies, hair shedding and google searches aside, this week is carrying on the weekend’s low key streak. We had plans to pick Josh up from the Ferry tonight and take the boys to the park, but instead we grabbed some food and came home to hang out on the couch. I’m soaking up these last few days before school starts. I love structure and routine, but this Summer has been (mostly) relaxing and I’m hesitant for the demand of school days to begin again. This week, I’m putting chores and to-do lists aside and spending extra time playing cars, wrestling, doing summersaults and walking down to the bay with my little guys. It seems that San Francisco (our area at least) has decided it’s Summer and is giving us a few days of actual warm, Summery weather; which I’m thankful for even though I’ve been stockpiling sweaters for Fall. If you follow me on twitter, you might have heard that we finally closed on our house in Kansas City! That has elevated a lot of stress and makes putting those to-do lists aside much easier.

Veterinary medicine

Veterinary medicine is the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, disorder and injury in non-human animals. The scope of veterinary medicine is wide, covering all animal species, both domesticated and wild, with a wide range of conditions which can affect different species.

Veterinary medicine is widely practiced, both with and without professional supervision. Professional care is most often led by a veterinary physician (also known as a vet, veterinary surgeon or veterinarian), but also by paraveterinary workers such as veterinary nurses or technicians. This can be augmented by other paraprofessionals with specific specialisms such as animal physiotherapy or dentistry, and species relevant roles such as farriers.

Veterinary science

Veterinary science helps human health through the monitoring and control of zoonotic disease (infectious disease transmitted from non-human animals to humans), food safety, and indirectly through human applications from basic medical research. They also help to maintain food supply through livestock health monitoring and treatment, and mental health by keeping pets healthy and long living. Veterinary scientists often collaborate with epidemiologists, and other health or natural scientists depending on type of work. Ethically, veterinarians are usually obliged to look after animal welfare.

Deepwood Veterinary Clinic

22 April 2019

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